Jigoku Dayuu (Hell Courtesan) 地獄太夫

Jigoku Tayuu (地獄太夫), the “Hell Courtesan,” is a character who has been fascinating for me since I first read about her in high school or university.
Known as the daughter of a Samurai (therefore of noble blood) of the Muromachi Period in Japan (1336 to 1573) Jigoku Dayuu was apparently abducted while young and forced to work as a high-class tayuu (太夫), or high-class courtesans.

She lamented her fate, and didn’t dress in the gorgeous kimonos that were the standard of courtesans — she wore a kimono depicting hellish images, fire, skeletons, blood. It was dark imagery, but she was legendary for her beauty regardless, and was once visited by the famous Buddhist Monk Ikkyu, who was impressed by her wisdom and strong character.

It was said that they exchanged some witty one-liner observations about their respective social positions, and became friends afterward.

Jigoku Tayuu died young (of course!) and famously left behind instructions not to cremate her or bury her, but to “simply leave her body in the fields to feed the bellies of starving dogs.” A compassionate, wonderful thought. But, it’s said that she was buried anyway with respect and not left for the dogs to eat, which she actually would not have considered an insult.
She might be too dark for a YA book. But I’m strongly considering her as a key character in my yokai fantasy.

Author: yukirat575

I'm a writer and comic artist. I write stories about a few issues that have been a revelation in my adult life, including: - Relationships and mental health - Animal well-being - Dungeons and Dragons - Social change As a writer/editor who has been working in this world for years, I've had to come to terms over the years that nothing has prepared me for this world and how to survive in it with your soul intact. My fiction and creative work is an attempt to deal with the changes and the lessons that I wished were available to me much earlier in life.

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